Author Archives: willknocker

Waterbuck in NNP

 

By Will Knocker:

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Common  waterbuck in Nairobi National Park: not a numerous species in what is a predominantly savannah park…

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There are two separate populations in the park: in the Athi Basin & to the West, in the Langata Forest.

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The latter population (in the Langata Forest, which is ideal habitat) is definitely increasing: could this be because lions prefer the grasslands of the Athi Basin, where there are more prey animals (including waterbuck?)

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A fine male….

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Nairobi National Park boasts no less than 16 sp. of antelope: what a refuge for these beautiful ungulates.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Waterbuck

 

 

Vultures: Eurasian Griffon in NNP ?

By Adam Scott Kennedy:

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These vultures were at the murram pits at the top of the Athi Basin…

 

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Brian Finch poses the question: is this an immature Eurasian Griffon or one of our African Ruppell’s?

 

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Simon Thomsett or Munir Virani, any ID guesses?

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Thank goodness NNP remains an oasis for vultures of many species…..

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On the Athi Plains

By Will Knocker:

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Is there a better place to be than on the African Plain?

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On the Athi Plain in particular where grass is a super-abundant resource….

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NNP & what is left (very little) of the dispersal area is home to a herd of 4000 Plains zebra…

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and 18 species of Bovidae (buffalo & antelopes..)

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And all this in a city of 5 million H. sapiens………WOW !

Nairobi Buff

By Will Knocker:

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Buffalo are doing very well in the Park, increasing in numbers over time. 314 were counted in April, but there are probably more in these pictures than this number indicates…

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NNP is perfect habitat for buffaloes, containing plenty of water & grazing as it does, although by the time the Park was founded in 1946 there were none: they had all been shot. So the present population are all immigrants!

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In the abscence of zootic disease (& this will become more of a risk in the future as wildlife is confined strictly to the Park area & numbers increase) & droughts, buffalo numbers should impact positively on the quality of grazing in the Park, where grass in a normal year of rain is in super-abundance…

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One of the charms of visiting the Park is to find one of the big herds (of which there are several) & to ‘commune’ with these wild cattle as they go about their business from the safety of one’s vehicle, which they usually ignore. To watch the social interactions, especially amongst the massive bulls, is to appreciate the principles of bovine society  & mating rights, which go to the the biggest, baddest males…..

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As buffaloes have been extirpated through much of Africa through hunting, it is a real privilege to watch these massive, gentle grazers going about their business, peacefully in the wild….

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Part of another herd in the middle of the city, on the plains below the Ngong Hills: NNP is truly a national treasure.

Hoopoe & Frog

By Adam Scott Kennedy:

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Treacherous Croc

By Will Knocker:

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Marabous all of a twitter…”isn’t that one of us in his mouth” ?

 

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Sure looks like it….

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“Ooo-err…it’s Fred !”

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Plenty more where that came from…..

 

 

 

Bushbuck

By Will Knocker:

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A female bushbuck in it’s element in one of the many diverse habitats in Nairobi National Park, where it is common.

 

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Although common (the most widespread antelope sp. in Africa) bushbuck are solitary creatures & usually difficult to spot (apart from in NNP!)

 

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They can live easily near people, although they are widely hunted for their meat outside protected areas.

 

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As shown here, if not persecuted, they can be very tolerant of people (this image actually from Aberdares NP)

 

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The beautiful bushbuck is easily bayed up by pursuing dogs, but hopefully not in the protected areas of Nairobi National Park.

More info:    http: //en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bushbuck

 

 

 

 

Wildlife Flourishing in NNP

By Will Knocker:

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Birding with Brian Finch 31st March

By Brian Finch:

On the morning of the final day of March, Mike Davidson, Heather
Elkins, Karen Plumbe and myself arrived at the Langata Entrance to
Nairobi National Park at 6.40am having had a fairly open Magadi Road.
At the gate we were all processed efficiently and cheerfully by
Customer Services, and through in no time.

It had been dry recently and the road around to Nagalomon Dam did not
have the mudholes of the previous week. As we passed the Langata
Forest dam there was an African Jacana, presumably the same individual
for the past couple of months.

We arrived at the Main Entrance and collected Jennifer, whilst Fleur
was there she had her daughter with her, and they went mainly
mammaling!

Not a lot was happening at KWS Mess, the usual Eastern Honeybird was
calling, a Spotted Flycatcher was on the fence, this being our first
of ten today, the Black-collared Apalis was noisy and that was about
it. Ivory Burning Site was also quiet with just the first of three
Olivaceous Warblers, but on the causeway at Nagalomon Dam were single
Great Reed Warbler (which could have been the wintering bird as no
more were seen today, and it was in the identical place), and a Garden
Warbler. The dam itself provided the first Great Cormorant in a long
while, an impressive five Darters, ten Black-crowned Night-Herons, the
small Great Egret, a pair of Swamphens, and a pair of Spotted
Thick-knees were back at the drift.

There was not a lot of activity along the back road to the new swamp,
one of just two Eurasian Hobbys, the first of three Willow Warblers,
the first of only three Red-backed Shrikes, whilst at the swamp there
was an African Water Rail, fifteen Wood and two Green Sandpipers.

Retracing, and on to Hyena Dam for anxiously awaited coffee, we found
the first of just four Black-shouldered Kites, a female Eurasian Marsh
Harrier, another African Water Rail, another Swamphen, another dozen
Wood Sandpipers with two Ruff of which one had just one leg, a Sedge
Warbler called from concealment, whilst a Eurasian Reed Warbler was
very showy sitting in the open basking and preening on a reed for a
long period. We tried along the side road, but the water was still
flowing from the new swamp, and just had our first of seven Whinchats.

Taking the run-off we found the grassland full of bouncing Jackson’s
Widowbirds, and a pair of very few Quailfinches were seen. Mbuni was
quiet, just a Willow Warbler, and no sign of the Tawny Eagles at the
nest, but they were probably not far away. The Crowned Crane was still
incubating, and four Yellow-crowned Bishops were in the sedges. Eland
Hollow Dam had nothing new, the African Jacana still there, as was a
Spotted Thick-knee, the same Greenshank that has wintered was still
here, with a few Wood Sandpipers, then in the sedges were three Sedge
Warblers and four more Yellow-crowned Bishops.

Driving through the grassland we had our first of three
Secretarybirds, single Lesser and Common Kestrels, two individual Kori
Bustards, and an additional female with two very small chicks above
Athi Basin, the first of two Turkestan Shrikes, and the first of only
three Lesser Grey Shrikes. At the Murrum Pits was a Red-throated Pipit
getting some colour, but only five White-backed Vultures were in to
bathe, and after quite a long time White-tailed Larks were singing
again.

Athi Dam had a few birds, an adult Pink-backed Pelican, fifteen White
Storks with a party of five Open-billed Storks, five Black-winged
Stilts, six Spur-winged and eight Kittlitz’s Plovers, two
summer-plumaged Ringed Plovers, ten Little Stint, a Common Greenshank
and three Common Sandpipers. There were two roosting Black-crowned
Night-Herons on the causeway where the wintering Olivaceous was still
present in the same tree, and in very good voice.
Although not much of the Park had seen rain, Athi had obviously had a
downpour, and the dam was quite high again, and peripheral weeds were
inundated.

It was not very eventful towards Cheetah Gate, but men were working on
the pylons again, and the closed road was open. Presumably just to let
the stima people in through Cheetah Gate, with their heavy machinery.
We had a look but nothing rewarded us apart from a few Speckle-fronted
Weavers.

Driving along the river we had our only Bateleur of the day, and the
same for Fish Eagle, there was also the first African Hoopoe in quite
a while. Near Rhino Circuit we had our best mammal of the day, with
only my second ever Kirk’s Dik-Dik in the Park!

It was quiet all around to Kingfisher, where on earth are all the
shrikes that should be here? There were eight Black-winged Plover on
the burnt piece, both they and Crowned Plovers had nested and had
single chicks.

We were out by 4.30pm and the traffic was flowing smoothly.

It had been a fairly disappointing day for migrants, just scratchings.
Barn Swallows were flowing through in fair numbers but nothing
dramatic.

Hippos were at Nagalomon, Hyena and Athi Dams, a few Black and White
Rhinos were seen. Plains game concentrated along the southern border
and the burnt area.

Diceros bicornis michaeli

By Will Knocker:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eastern_black_rhinoceros

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